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Santa Fe NM 87501

Phone:
505-827-5760

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NOTICE – PUBLIC ROOM LIMITED RE-OPENING

Stephanie Garcia Richard, Commissioner of Public Lands

State of New Mexico

NOTICE

Public Room – Limited Re-opening

Contact Ley Schimoler, Director Records Management Division

505/827-5721

lschimoler@slo,state.nm.us

The public research room at the State Land Office will be re-opened on Thursday, September 17, 2020.

The Public Room will be open on Mondays & Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon, and from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. by appointment only.

Please e-mail Josh Chavez at JChavez@slo.state.nm.us, cc: RKepler@slo.state.nm.us to request an appointment. 

The health and safety of Land Office employees and visitors is our top priority.  As such, it is essential that all visitors adhere to the established procedures. These procedures will be e-mailed to all visitors upon confirmation of their appointment.

Access to State Trust Land Increased For Sportspeople Just In Time for Deer and Elk Season

Stephanie Garcia Richard, Commissioner of Public Lands

State of New Mexico

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 1, 2020

Contact:

Angie Poss, Assistant Commissioner of Communications

505.470.2965

aposs@slo.state.nm.us

Access to State Trust Land Increased For Sportspeople Just In Time for Deer and Elk Season

SANTA FE, NM – The State Land Office (SLO) and the Department of Game and Fish (DGF) today announced the completion of project work aimed to increase access to state trust land for licensed hunters just in time for the beginning of deer and elk hunting season, which kicks off today.

In March, 2020, SLO and DGF signed an Easement giving licensed sportspeople access to 8.8 million acres of state trust land. DGF paid the SLO $800,000 for access, with an agreement to partner with SLO for $200,000 worth of projects aimed to enhance access to state trust land.

The projects completed to date toward achieving that goal include:

  • 67 new sportsperson access points including signage (20 vehicle access, 47 walk-in access)
  • improvements completed to Luera Mountains Access Road in Catron County
  • new Turkey Ridge campsite on Chupadera Mesa in Socorro County

“Working in tandem with the Department of Game and Fish to figure out how to increase access to state trust land to benefit our New Mexico sportspeople has been a priority of mine from day one,” Commissioner of Public Lands Stephanie Garcia Richard said. “Creating new access points, making improvements to roads that people rely on to travel in and out of hunts, and making more state trust land available for camping are part of our joint efforts to deliver on the promises included within the hunting Easement.”

The SLO and DGF worked collaboratively to identify and sign 67 new vehicle or walk-in access points where licensed sportspeople can access state trust land. The new and previously existing access points are mapped online and can be found here. They can also be found on popular hunting access apps like CarryMap.

The improvements made to the Luera Mountains Access road allows for clearance in most standard four-wheel drive vehicles, whereas before the work, it was only passable in an ATV or modified high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle. 

Finally, the addition of a campsite at Chupadera Mesa in Socorro County will provide a brand new camping opportunity in one of the largest contiguous areas of state trust land in the state. The nearest camping opportunity on state trust land is over 22 miles away.

“The Department appreciates the State Land Office’s recognition of the importance of access to state trust lands for New Mexico’s sports people,” said New Mexico Department of Game and Fish director Michael Sloane. “Wildlife related recreation is an important economic driver in our rural communities and increased access is an important way to grow its positive effect on local communities.”

At the end of July, the SLO launched pilot programs for new dispersed camping areas in the White Peak region as well as backpack camping permits in the Luera Mountains. The programs were aimed at people with deer and elk tags to hunt in the two areas. The backpack camping permits were all issued by mid-August, but permits for White Peak are still available. Applications can be found here.

In addition to announcing completed project work, SLO is also seeking volunteers to pioneer a first-ever Ambassador Program.  White Peak experts who have utilized the White Peak area recreationally and continue to hunt or hike it, as well as SLO lessees in the area are encouraged to apply online.

Ambassadors are proactive communicators and positive liaisons between the SLO, recreational users, and lessees. Their objective is to understand the facts about the area, and be able to share that information with users as a resource, fostering positive interactions between the multiple users of state trust land.

Under the leadership of Commissioner of Public Lands Stephanie Garcia Richard, the New Mexico State Land Office has seen back-to-back years of revenue over $1 billion. Over 13 million acres of state trust land are leased for a variety of uses, including ranching and farming, renewable energy, business development, mineral development, and outdoor recreation. The money earned from leasing activity supports 22 beneficiaries – New Mexico public schools, seven universities and colleges, the School for the Deaf, the School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, three hospital, water and land conservation projects, and public building construction and repair.

State Land Office Fiscal Year 2020 Revenue On Track To Break $1 Billion

Commissioner of Public Lands, Stephanie Garcia Richard

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 18, 2020

Contact:

Angie Poss, Assistant Commissioner of Communications

505.470.2965

aposs@slo.state.nm.us

State Land Office Fiscal Year 2020 Revenue On Track To Break $1 Billion

Back-to-back billion dollar years break historic revenue records

SANTA FE, NM – The New Mexico State Land Office will again rake in over $1 billion in revenue for the recent fiscal year. Given the nature of oil and gas royalty payment collection, final total royalty revenue will not be posted until October. With conservative projections for the last two months of the fiscal year, 2020 revenue is projected to be approximately $1,065,000,000.

“In these uncertain times driven by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are grateful to still be Open for Business and making an impact for New Mexico families. Every dollar that we raise goes directly back into communities, supporting vital institutions, with the largest chunk of our revenue going to help fund our public schools who need resources now more than ever,” Commissioner Garcia Richard said. “That we were able to again break $1 billion is a testament to the staff of the Land Office. Navigating an unprecedented pandemic wasn’t in the plan, but our employees rose to the occasion with our beneficiaries, our mission, and priorities in mind.”

Every dollar earned by the Land Office is a dollar taxpayers do not have to pay to support public institutions, saving the average taxpaying household an estimated $1,500 yearly and helping to keep the tax burden low for struggling families in these difficult times. The Land Office raises revenue from business lease payments, renewable energy project leases, oil and gas payments and earnings, right-of-way easements, livestock grazing leases, permits, interest, fees and royalties.

Revenue from these sources is deposited into one of two funds before being distributed to public schools, colleges, hospitals and other important state institutions. Money brought in from leases that do not permanently deplete a resource, such as renewable energy, livestock grazing, business leases, or planning and development, is deposited into the Land Maintenance Fund, which is distributed monthly to beneficiaries. Money from deals that deplete a resource, such as royalty paid for the extraction of oil, gas and minerals, is deposited into the Land Grant Permanent Fund, and distributed to beneficiaries after investment by the State Investment Council.

Oil and gas exploration and the subsequent royalty paid on production remains the Land Office’s largest revenue source, totaling 90.4% of all receipts, down by 3% compared to 94% of all receipts in fiscal year 2019.

The estimated total royalty to be sent by the Land Office to the State Investment Council for investment in the Land Grant Permanent Fund for fiscal year 2020 is over $879 million.

Garcia Richard added, “It’s important for the Land Office to be seen as a consistent source of income for the institutions that we support. We are working hard to diversify our revenue sources to assure that if we see future decreases in the price of oil like we did this year, other activities are thriving so that the beneficiaries don’t take a hit.”

Notable revenue changes in FY 2020 over FY 2019 include:

  • a 118% increase in revenue from wind energy projects and lease payments (from $406,685 in FY 19 to $885,273 in FY 20)
  • a 58% increase in revenue from right-of-way easement payments (from $24.7 million in FY 19 to $39 million in FY 20)
  • a 5% decrease in oil and gas royalty payments (from $899 million in FY 19 to $854 million in FY 20)

The State Land Office has worked with lessees where revenue decreases as a result of the pandemic put a strain on business operations. This includes prioritizing projects and efforts to help businesses including deferring rent payments and implementing a rule change to allow temporary shut-ins of oil wells until prices stabilize.

Based on lower and unpredictable oil and gas prices as well as a decrease in production due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Land Office predicts fiscal year 2021 revenue to be a different story than the billion dollar years of 2019 and 2020. Commissioner Garcia Richard has stated her intent to prioritize revenue diversification through renewable energy projects, economic development opportunities, and outdoor recreation partnerships in order to maximize the potential of the state trust land in her care.

Under the leadership of Commissioner of Public Lands Stephanie Garcia Richard, the New Mexico State Land Office has seen back-to-back years of revenue over $1 billion. Over 13 million acres of state trust land are leased for a variety of uses, including ranching and farming, renewable energy, business development, mineral development, and outdoor recreation. The money earned from leasing activity supports 22 beneficiaries – New Mexico public schools, seven universities and colleges, the School for the Deaf, the School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, three hospital, water and land conservation projects, and public building construction and repair.

State Land Office Holding Virtual Public Meeting Regarding Silver City Area Restoration Project

Stephanie Garcia Richard, Commissioner of Public Lands

State of New Mexico

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 11, 2020

Contact:

Angie Poss, Assistant Commissioner of Communications

505.470.2965

aposs@slo.state.nm.us

State Land Office Holding Virtual Public Meeting Regarding Silver City Area Restoration Project

SANTA FE, NM – The New Mexico State Land Office invites the public to a meeting to learn about and give feedback on a restoration project in Silver City that will affect the Maude’s Canyon area.

The Maude’s Canyon restoration project seeks to restore desired conditions within a riparian corridor on state trust land that is currently supporting non-native, invasive plants such as Siberian elm, Russian olive, and salt cedar. Invasive species will be removed to improve ecological function and favor native species such as willow and cottonwood.

Additionally, adjacent meadows will be restored that have been threatened by juniper expansion. The desired conditions will provide increased flexibility for fire suppression and management if necessary due to close proximity of homes and businesses. Secondary outcomes will include a more diverse plant community including grasses, forbs and shrubs and enhanced habitat conditions for wildlife.

“I was raised in Silver City and I understand how engaged the public is, especially when it concerns the pristine outdoor spaces in and around the city” Commissioner of Public Lands Stephanie Garcia Richard said. “We want the public to participate in this meeting so that we can hear their feedback on the project as well as to inform people of how the project work might affect them.” 

The virtual meeting will be held on Zoom. Information can be found here.

Under the leadership of Commissioner of Public Lands Stephanie Garcia Richard, the New Mexico State Land Office has seen back-to-back years of revenue over $1 billion. Over 13 million acres of state trust land are leased for a variety of uses, including ranching and farming, renewable energy, business development, mineral development, and outdoor recreation. The money earned from leasing activity supports 22 beneficiaries – New Mexico public schools, seven universities and colleges, the School for the Deaf, the School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, three hospital, water and land conservation projects, and public building construction and repair.

August 13, 2020 Maude’s Canyon Restoration Project Public Meeting

Interested members of the public are invited to a public meeting to learn about a State Land Office restoration project in Silver City.

Public Meeting to be held via Zoom on Thursday, August 13th from 4:00 to 5:00 PM

You are invited to a NM State Land Office Zoom meeting.
When: Aug 13, 2020 04:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcud-ytqDotG9Q_G2Av9PV7NSv4IWFVkasV

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

This meeting will also be Livestreamed at www.Facebook.com/NMLandOffice

READ THE PROJECT PLAN

Project Details:

The Maude’s Canyon restoration project in Silver City seeks to restore desired conditions within a riparian corridor on state trust land that is currently supporting non-native, invasive plants such as Siberian elm, Russian olive, and salt cedar. Invasive species will be removed to improve ecological function and favor native species such as willow and cottonwood. Additionally, adjacent meadows will be restored that have been threatened by juniper expansion. The desired conditions will provide increased flexibility for fire suppression and management if necessary due to close proximity of homes and businesses. Secondary outcomes will include a more diverse plant community including grasses, forbs and shrubs and enhanced habitat conditions for wildlife.

Riparian Restoration:

• Target species for herbicide treatment include tree of heaven, salt cedar, Siberian elm, and Russian olive.
• Manually apply Garlon 4 Ultra at a rate of 3 quarts/ acre with a basal oil at 25% volume to volume. A blue indicator dye should be added to the spray mixture to show prior treatment of stumps. Do NOT spray this mixture in the river/irrigation canals/ditches or other areas where water is present. Establish a buffer of 10 feet to prevent contamination of water sources.
• Extreme caution should be taken to avoid spraying willows, cottonwoods, and other native vegetation. Consider all factors such as drift and wind speed/direction to avoid contacting willows, cottonwoods, and native trees or shrubs with herbicide.
• All suckers/saplings located inside of or within 1 O feet of a water source must be removed by hand.
• A basal bark treatment must be applied to individual saltcedar, Siberian elm, and Russian olive:;; 6 feet tall or with stems less than 6 inches in basal diameter. Spray should be applied from the base of the stem to a height of 12-15 inches above the ground, thoroughly wetting the stems but not to the point where herbicide runs off and puddles.
• A cut-stump treatment will be performed on all mature non-native, invasive tree species including salt cedar, Russian olive, and Siberian elm. All stumps will be cut to within 5 inches of the ground.

All woody material (target species) greater than 3 inches in diameter will be limbed and laid flat on the ground. All woody material (target species) less than 3 inches will be lopped and scattered not to exceed a height of 8 inches.

• All junipers within the riparian zone will be cut, lopped, and scattered not to exceed a height of 8 inches.
• Herbicide applicators must have all certificates or licenses required by
state and federal laws.
• All herbicides must be stored, mixed, applied, stored, and disposed of
according to the specific and detailed information outlined on the label.
• In advance of pesticide use, safety protocols will be developed for storing, mixing, transporting, applying, handling spills, and disposal of unused
herbicides and containers. Applicators must wear all protective gear
required on the label of the herbicide that is used.
• Contractor is responsible for ensuring an effective herbicide treatment. Considerations for an effective application include, but are not limited to, mixture rate, water chemistry, weather conditions, potential precipitation following application, and proper timing with understanding of target plant phenology.

Meadow Restoration:

• Remove approximately 80% of juniper trees of treatment area. Junipers with smallest diameter should be targeted for removal.
• Retain 20% of largest trees in mosaic variable shaped groups.
• Distances between untreated areas should vary depending on topography and existing vegetation structure.
• Treated and untreated areas should be irregular in shape and follow
natural contours.
• Retain deciduous shrub species where possible. Decadent shrubs may be cut to stimulate growth.
• Retain all snags greater than 8 inches DBH for wildlife habitat.
• No leave trees will be limbed, pruned, lopped, or altered in any way.
• Mastication treatment should go all the way to the ground.
• Mastication depths should not exceed 3 inches. Masticated material
should not exceed 2 feet in length.
• No new roads will be created. Any temporary access routes will be closed after use with slash placement and water bars if needed.

The entire project encompasses 30 acres for mechanical thinning.

Project Area

State Land Trusts Advisory Board Meeting – August 20, 2020

The New Mexico State Land Trusts Advisory Board will hold a public meeting on Thursday, August 20, 2020, at 10:00 a.m., and continuing thereafter as necessary, via audio and video conference due to the COVID-19 public health emergency. The public may join the meeting through the following link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/844766013 The public may also dial into the meeting via phone: (646) 749-3122; Access Code: 844-766-013. You may sign up for public comment in advance by calling (505) 827-5761 or emailing ashaw@slo.state.nm.us.

Any change to the location or time of the meeting will be posted with a final agenda on the SLO webpage (www.nmstatelands.org) at least 72 hours prior to the date and time specified in this notice.

The Agenda includes: Call to Order, Roll Call, Welcome, Approval of Agenda, Approval of August 29, 2019 Minutes, Adoption of 2020 Open Meetings Act Resolution, Agency Update, Financial Report, Division Updates, Questions and Answers, Public Comments, Closing Remarks, Closed Executive Session, Adjournment.

The Agenda is available on the State Land Office website. To request a hard copy, contact Alysha Shaw at (505) 827-5761 or ashaw@slo.state.nm.us.

If you are an individual with a disability and you require assistance or an auxiliary aid (such as a sign language interpreter) to participate in any aspect of this meeting, please contact Alysha Shaw by August 6, 2020 at (505) 827-5761 or ashaw@slo.state.nm.us.

Download the agenda here.

View the 2020 Open Meetings Act Resolution Draft here.

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