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FAQs

Do you need some help?

The quickest way to reach us is to contact us through the contact form on the website.

Address:
310 Old Santa Fe Trail,
Santa Fe NM 87501

Phone:
505-827-5760

Administrative Services

What revenues have we earned to date?

View the Monthly Revenue Report

What is the difference between the Land Grant Permanent Fund (LGPF) and the Land Maintenance Fund?
The Land Grant permanent fund receives royalty payments from non-renewable resources (oil, gas and mineral extraction). The State Land Office transfers royalties collected by beneficiary to the State Investment Council (SIC) monthly. The SIC manages the permanent fund and distributes funds to beneficiaries’ monthly based Constitutional provisions and the beneficiaries proportionate share of the fund.

The Land Maintenance Fund is generated by revenue from renewable resources: leases, rights-of-way and interest. State Land Office operating expenses (approved by the Legislature) are paid from revenue collected and the balance is distributed proportionately to the beneficiaries that earned revenue in that month.

How is the beneficiary amount determined?

Each tract of land is tied to a specific beneficiary. Activities (usually documented in a lease or other legal instrument) on the tract of land determine the type of revenue earned – that is whether it is rental income (from rental leasing, bonuses, interest or miscellaneous activity) or royalties (from the sale of land or extraction of minerals). Any activity that generates income from any source is credited to the land/beneficiary that earned that income.

Rental Income is earned through the leasing of land. The amount due each beneficiary depends on the terms of the lease and the activity that generates the income. The income for the month net of SLO expenses is distributed to the earning beneficiary at the end of each month.

Royalty income is based on the extraction of minerals pursuant to a lease and the amounts are lease terms dictate the amount of royalty to be paid. Payments are processed and transferred to the Land Grant Permanent Fund on behalf of the earning beneficiary.

What are the projections for the beneficiaries?

The State Land Office does not publish projections as they could create expectations on the part of the beneficiaries that may not be realized.

What are the historical revenues?

Commercial Resources

What are the responsibilities of the Commercial Resources Division?

The Commercial Resources Division is responsible for:

  1. Commercial leasing
  2. Exchanges
  3. Sales
  4. Recreational and educational access permits.

What is the policy of the Commissioner of Public Land on sale of trust land?

Commissioner Dunn will ensure that land trades are evaluated in the most transparent manner possible. Commissioner Dunn maintains the standard that all trades are optimized to benefit the recipients of the trust land revenues in the short and long term.

What kind of land exchanges are possible?

Land exchanges have taken place with other government entities, including local government and NM Indian tribes, and with private parties. Land exchanges with other government entities are more common, but exchanges with private parties are also possible in limited circumstances. All proposed land exchanges will be evaluated to determine if the proposed exchange benefits the trust. Please see Rule 21 governing land exchanges.

What types of leasing of trust lands are possible?

The Commercial Resources Division leases land for many types of commercial purposes, including but not limited to: office, retail, and industrial; economic development parks, including high technology parks; Planning and Development leases for planned mixed use communities; telecommunications; renewable energy; oil and gas surface uses (e.g. compressor sites). All business leases are governed by Rule 9, except for planning and development leases, which are governed by Rule 22.

For how many years can I lease trust land?

Most business leases are for five year terms. However, by statute any lease for a term greater than five years requires a public auction following a ten week advertising period. This process is also set forth in Rule 9.

How do I apply for a commercial lease?

Standard business leasing forms may be found here and may be filled out electronically then printed and mailed to the address on the application. However, for some types of leases more information will be required. Please contact the Commercial Resources Division at (505) 827-5724 for more information.

How long does it take to get a decision following a lease application?

This depends on the complexity of the lease. The review and analysis of the lease application involves the collaborative work of many professional staff within the Land Office, including field staff headquartered in regions throughout the state, field biologist, archaeologist, financial analyst, planner, appraiser, and others.

How can I get a recreational permit on state lands?

Information about recreational access to state trust lands can be found on our Recreational Access page or by contacting our Commercial Resources Division at 505-827-5784.

Renewable Energy 

Are there maps showing the locations of trust lands with good wind and solar energy resources, and the location of trust land leased for these projects?

View map for: (1) solar energy resources in New Mexico; and (2) current leases (and applications) on trust land for solar projects.
View map for: (1) wind energy resources in New Mexico; and (2) current leases (and applications) on trust land for wind projects.

Surface Resources

What is the function of the Surface Resources Division?

Surface Resources manages programs dealing with watershed health, site remediation, illegal dumping, prescribed fire, wildlife management, cultural resources, agricultural leasing, and outdoor recreation. The staff supports other State Land Office divisions with field reviews and data analysis for programs including rights-of-way, minerals management, oil and gas frontier nominations, business leases and land exchanges.

How can I lease state trust land?

Contact the appropriate division for the type of lease you want: Oil & Gas and MineralsAgricultural or Commercial.

Where can I hunt on state trust land?

Access to State Trust Land for the purpose of hunting is granted under an easement between the Department of Game and Fish and the New Mexico State Land Office. For more information about hunting on State Trust Land, please see our Recreational Access page. For more information on the general rules and regulations pertaining to hunting in the State of New Mexico, please visit the New Mexico Department of Game & Fish.
 

Can I cross private land to hunt state trust land?

You may cross private land ONLY with written permission from the landowner (s).

Can I camp on state trust land?

Camping is allowed on trust land either with the written permission of the surface lessee or under the terms of the State Land Office’s easement agreement with the New Mexico Department of Game & Fish, here. To determine lessee and contact information, please contact our Agricultural Leasing Division at (505) 827-5851.

Who do I contact if I encounter a locked gate on state trust land during hunting season?

Under the Game and Fish easement, during hunting season, state trust land that is accessible by public road is open for hunting. If you encounter a locked gate on state trust land included that you think should be open, please contact the nearest District Resource Manager, here.

How can I find out who is leasing a particular piece of state trust land?

Visit the State Land Office data access web page and enter the section, township, and range, or lease number. If you do not have this information, or if you need assistance, please contact our Agricultural Leasing Division at (505) 827-5851.

Mineral Resources

How do I get a mineral lease?

Application forms for Industrial Mineral Leases (Sand & Gravel, Borrow Dirt, Stone, Caliche, etc.) are available on the Minerals Forms page.  We can also send you a copy of the State Land Office rules and application forms pertaining to the particular type of mineral extraction you want to engage in.  Click here to view the Minerals Staff Directory.

For any other questions you may have about the mining for minerals (other than oil and gas) on state trust lands, please contact the Minerals Manager, Jack Yates, at (505) 827-5750.

Which rules apply to the various minerals available on the state trust land?

Please see Mineral Rules.

Where in New Mexico are the state trust lands and the federal public lands?

A State of New Mexico map showing surface ownership is available from the federal Bureau of Land Management.

Our State Land Office Records Management office can help you if you know the legal land description (Section, Township, and Range) for a piece of land in which you are interested. Please be sure to check the mineral ownership for any tract on which you are interested in mining. Please note that the lands under the stewardship of the State Land Office are referred to as state trust land, not “public” land. The federal Bureau of Land Management manages public land.

For any other questions you may have about mining for minerals (other than oil and gas) occurring on state trust lands, please contact the Minerals Manager, Jack Yates, at (505) 827-5750.

I own land in New Mexico. How do I find out if the Land Office owns the mineral rights?

Please contact our Records Management division at (505) 827-5716.

Have I paid my rent?

Visit the State Land Office data access web page and click on billing Information. You will need to enter your lease number in the appropriate boxes.

How do I get a bond?

Download the Bond Instruction Sheet. If you have additional questions, please contact our minerals division at (505) 827-5849.

How do I assign my general mining lease to another company?

Oil & Gas

Why is it that no more than two persons are allowed to own a state lease?

By State Land Office rule, no more than two persons/legal entities may be named as the lessee of record on an oil and gas lease. If two persons/legal entities are the lessee of record on a particular lease, the lessees are joint tenants and the state views each lessee as having a 100% undivided interest in it.

What exactly are Miscellaneous Instruments?

Miscellaneous Instruments are other contracts and instruments entered into by the lessee that do not affect record title. Per 19.2.100.43 NMAC, The State Land Commissioner does not approve Miscellaneous Instruments. Currently the Commissioner is only accepting three types of Miscellaneous Instruments, these types are identified on the Miscellaneous Instrument Filing Form. Other instruments such as assignments of interest, undivided working interests, overrides, farm outs/rights to explore and produce below a certain depth, overriding royalty assignments, operating rights, financial statements, and powers of attorney, etc. should be filed with the applicable County Clerk’s Office.

What are the fees for submitting assignments?

A $100 filing fee is required on each lease for which an assignment of record title is filed. A late fee of an additional $150 per lease is required if the assignment is filed with our office more than 100 days from the assignor’s execution date on the form. The fee for filing miscellaneous instruments is $50 for each associated lease.   All filing fees are non-refundable.

What form is required when submitting a record title assignment?

NMSLO’s Assignment of Oil and Gas Lease (form 0-30-A) is required.  The 0-30-A form should NOT be altered; the language of the official form will bind all parties.  Attachments to the form are permissible, if necessary, in order to capture additional signatures. No reservations, percentages or depth restrictions are permissible in a record title assignment.  Please complete the mailing address of the assignee, as lease correspondence will be sent to this address.

See Oil and Gas Forms

Is the assignment 0-30-A form available on the Internet?

 
Additionally, you may contact the Assignments, Miscellaneous Instruments Analyst and they can fax or email you one.
You may copy the form but all copies must be exact reproductions of the official form, with original signatures.

Why does the form 0-30-A require all signatures be notarized?

Any legal instrument that is a transfer of real property must be acknowledged before a notary, required by statute.  Record title transfers are considered transfers of real estate in New Mexico.

Why does my lease assignment have a suffix number attached to it?

Every time a transfer of record title is approved a suffix number, aka the assignment number, is systematically generated to distinctly identify that assignment.  The number of assignments within an entire lease determines the next assignment number, generated sequentially.

Is a transfer of record title on a portion of the lands accepted?

Yes, an assignment of partial acreage may be filed as a record assignment.  To indicate a partial acreage, Record Title Assignment please check the “Partial Assignment” box at the top of the 0-30-A form.  No less than a full quarter/quarter or a full lot of an Oil and Gas Lease will be approved as a 100% Record Title Assignment.

If I have a large number of assignments to make, do I have to complete the paperwork for each and every assignment?

No, Blanket Assignments/exhibits are accepted by NMSLO.  A Blanket Assignment must be completed in triplicate, notarized, original signatures are required on each, and an exhibit A must be attached.  Additionally, a copy of the signed assignment must be submitted for each lease listed on the exhibit.   Blanket assignments are limited to 25 lease assignments per exhibit and filing fees are due for each lease listed on said exhibit.  Please contact our staff for a template of the required exhibit format.

What is an OGRID?

It is an Oil and Gas Remittance Identifier. This is a number that is utilized by three agencies: the State Land Office (NMSLO); the Oil Conservation Division (OCD); and the Taxation and Revenue Department (TRD).  OGRID numbers are used by these agencies to identify each entity and track various transactions and data.

When do I need an OGRID?

When any business regarding Oil and Gas is conducted with the three state agencies, the entity must first obtain an OGRID number, i.e. in order to bid at our State Land Office monthly Oil and Gas Lease Sale, bidders must have an OGRID number.  To request an OGRID please contact NMSLO’s Oil and Gas Division.

If we do not remember our OGRID number, can we submit an assignment without it?

Yes, the Oil, Gas, and Minerals Division staff will research the OGRID number if it is left blank on the assignment form. The OGRID number will be documented on your returned copy of the approved assignment.

How do I notify the Land Office of an address change?

A formal request must be submitted either by letter or on the Change of Address Form, available online under Oil and Gas Forms.  Please provide the new address as well as the previous address.  Please provide current contact information as well.

Do I need to procure and file a bond or a waiver when I acquire a state Oil and Gas Lease?

Yes.

A Protect Surface Bond Waiver may be filed in lieu of a bond if there are no plans for development and no surface disturbance on lease.

Prior to the commencement of development/operations/surface disturbance on a lease, the NMSLO requires that a sufficient bond be filed with, and approved by the Commissioner.

What kind of bonds does the Land Office require from lessees?

  • Single lease Surface Damage Bond (Provides Surety for one Oil and Gas Lease)
  • $10,000
  • Multi-lease blanket Surface Damage Bond (Provides Surety for two or more Oil and Gas Leases)
  • $20,000
  •  Megabond (Provides Surety for Oil and Gas Leases, etc.  Please see the Megabond form for coverage details)
  • $25,000
  • A Cash Collateral Assignment is an acceptable alternative to procuring a bond from a surety company.  This form must be submitted in conjunction with the applicable bond form, determined by the amount deposited.
  •  Please refer to the Bond instructions, law and rule document for detailed information regarding bonds
  • See Oil and Gas Forms

How do I know when the oil and gas lease sales are held?

The sales are held the third Tuesday of every month. Lease sales are held online through the SLO auction contractor, EnergyNet.

Monthly Oil and Gas Lease Sale Notices are posted on the NMSLO website.

When would I need to pay a shut-in gas royalty?

Shut-in Royalty (SIR) payments are due per well, per year.  A completed Shut-In Royalty Payment form and the applicable payment may be submitted if:             

  1. The associated lease contract contains the shut-in provision.
  2. The well is capable of producing gas in paying quantities.
  3. The well is temporarily shut-in due to lack of market or lack of a pipeline connection.
  4. The lease(s) have not been extended in excess of the time allowed per the lease contract.

The SIR payment due is dependent upon the terms of your lease contract. The payment must be “timely paid,” which means on or before the next lease anniversary date after 90 days from the date of shut-in.  Each payment is reviewed according to the SIR requirements before acceptance or rejection.

What is a stipulation?

A stipulation is an amendment of the terms of an older oil and gas lease to the current lease terms.  Upon the Commissioner’s approval, the lease assignment stipulated to the current lease series terms now has access to the shut-in royalty payment and extension clauses, which were not offered in the older lease contracts.

The Stipulation fee is $150.00, the form and instructions are available on the Oil & Gas Forms page.

Water/Salt Wate Disposal

How can I get a permit for a water well?

How can I get a permit for a water well?

If the location of the proposed well is on State Trust Land, contact the Oil, Gas and Minerals Division at 505-827-5849. Water issues are handled by the Office of the State Engineer Water Rights Division 505-827-6120.

Please contact the Oil and Gas Leasing Group or the Lease Manager with any additional questions. Contact number: 505-827-5744

Records Request

How do I request copies of public records?

The Commissioner is committed to responding to IPRA requests in a timely manner. Please submit your request verbally, in writing or by e-mail to: NM State Land Office, 310 Old Santa Fe Trail, P.O. Box 1148, Santa Fe, NM 87504 SLO.IPRA@slo.state.nm.us or 505-827-5721. For additional information on public records requests, please see the New Mexico Attorney General’s IPRA Guide

Is there a charge for the copies?

Yes, see the current rates for copy fees. Payment must be received before the copies are sent.

What’s the difference between a certified copy and a regular copy?

A certified copy is stamped and sealed with the Commissioner’s seal and is certified to be a true copy of the original on file.

Righ Of Way

What is a right of way?

A right of way is a right or privilege granted by the commissioner, to pass over, upon, through, or across, a defined area of trust lands for a prescribed purpose and time. This right of way can be issued as a road, pipeline, telecommunication, or electrical.

How do I obtain a right of way easement?

We can send you an application form along with a copy of the State Land Office rule. When submitting an application, there is a
$250.00 fee. Along with the fee, you are required to submit a certified survey plat. All fees are non-refundable.

*When you provide a check as payment, you authorize the State of New Mexico to either use information from your check to make a one-time electronic fund transfer from your account or to process the payment as a check transaction.

See right-of-way forms here.

How much is a right of way?

he fee of your right of way will be determined by the actual rods that you apply for. There is a fee schedule based on the type of right of way that will determine the cost. There are four (4) types of fee schedules:

What is a “rod”?

A “rod” is a unit of measurement used when price is determined when issuing a right of way. A rod is equivalent to 16.5 linear feet.

How long will it take to have my application approved?

If the application is accurate and complete along with a survey plat, your right of way may be issued within 4 – 6 weeks. Application will be delayed if inaccurate or insufficient
information is received.

How can I obtain a right of entry permit?

A right of entry permit can be obtained by submitting the right of entry request form or by contacting our Commercial Resources Division at (505) 827-5842.

See right of entry forms here.

Why do I have to get a permit to use State Trust Land if it is public land?

STATE TRUST LANDS ARE OFTEN MISUNDERSTOOD IN TERMS OF BOTH THEIR CHARACTER AND THEIR MANAGEMENT. THEY ARE NOT PUBLIC LANDS, BUT ARE INSTEAD THE SUBJECT OF A PUBLIC TRUST CREATED TO SUPPORT THE EDUCATION OF NEW MEXICO’S CHILDREN. The land is declared public because the income from its resources is applied to the public good. The land that the State Land Office manages is Trust land. The SLO must, by statute and by constitution, manage the lands so that the 22 named beneficiary institutions around the state receive income from the Trust.

How can I get a permit for a water well?

The State Engineer’s Office handles water issues. The direct line to their Water Rights Division is 505-827-6120. If the land where you want to place a well is State Trust Land, contact the Oil, Gas and Minerals Division at 505-827- 5849.

What  kind of bonds does the SLO require from lessees?

Amounts for the various bonds are:

  • Single lease bond -$500
  • Blanket bond -$2,500
  • Megabond -$25,000

In lieu of these surety bonds, you may be able to submit:

  • cash bond
  • assignment of cash collateral irrevocable letter of credit
  • waiver and consent by surface owner / lessee

Will I be able to transfer my right-of-way if I ever have to?

You may assign the right-of-way in full or in part to someone else. However, the other person or entity must be bonded. If you assign your right of way in full, you may ask that your bond be closed out provided you don’t have any more rights-of-way in your name.

Do all gas pipelines have to be buried?

If a gas line is being laid, it can be laid on the surface if it is below 125 psi, if it goes over 125 psi the pipeline must be buried.

Is it possible to get a temporary access permit to dig up yuccas or landscaping rock on state lands?

Temporary access permits which are referred to as Right of Entry Permits (ROE) may be issued upon payment of such fees and costs as the commissioner deems in the best interest of the trust. Materials such as yuccas or rock for personal use may be sought with a temporary permit, but large quantities collected with intent to sell for profit must have a business lease approved. Any ground disturbance needs to protect cultural properties and may need an archaeological survey. ROE’s may be for one day and up to 180 days. The normal rate is a $50.00 filing fee and $500.00 administrative or permit fee. Term and use are factors that are used in determining the price. In all cases, a legal description of the area needs to be submitted along with the right of entry request form.

I hear you can hunt on state lands. What permits are required?

Perhaps you have heard of the Outfitting/Guiding permits allowed to individuals or companies to conduct outfitting or guiding services on state land for deer, elk lion, bear, rabbit, cougar and bear, etc. Wildlife not covered by the hunting and fishing licenses held by the permittee may not be hunted or fished. The permittee will be required to furnish proof of the permit granted by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. Application fee is $30.00. Permit fee which includes one campsite is $500.00 for a statewide permit. The term is limited to one year and must be within a Game and Fish Hunt Unit. Valid license-holders in cooperation with Game & Fish may hunt, fish and trap on designated trust land during open seasons.

Surface Resources

What is the function of the Surface Resources Division?

Surface Resources manages programs dealing with watershed health, site remediation, illegal dumping, prescribed fire, wildlife management, cultural resources, agricultural leasing, and outdoor recreation. The staff supports other State Land Office divisions with field reviews and data analysis for programs including rights-of-way, minerals management, oil and gas frontier nominations, business leases and land exchanges.

How can I lease state trust land?

Contact the appropriate division for the type of lease you want: Oil & Gas and MineralsAgricultural or Commercial.

Where can I hunt on state trust land?

Access to State Trust Land for the purpose of hunting is granted under an easement between the Department of Game and Fish and the New Mexico State Land Office. For more information about hunting on State Trust Land, please see our Recreational Access page. For more information on the general rules and regulations pertaining to hunting in the State of New Mexico, please visit the New Mexico Department of Game & Fish.
 

Can I cross private land to hunt state trust land?

You may cross private land ONLY with written permission from the landowner (s).

Can I camp on state trust land?

Camping is allowed on trust land either with the written permission of the surface lessee or under the terms of the State Land Office’s easement agreement with the New Mexico Department of Game & Fish, here. To determine lessee and contact information, please contact our Agricultural Leasing Division at (505) 827-5851.

Who do I contact if I encounter a locked gate on state trust land during hunting season?

Under the Game and Fish easement, during hunting season, state trust land that is accessible by public road is open for hunting. If you encounter a locked gate on state trust land included that you think should be open, please contact the nearest District Resource Manager, here.

How can I find out who is leasing a particular piece of state trust land?

Visit the State Land Office data access web page and enter the section, township, and range, or lease number. If you do not have this information, or if you need assistance, please contact our Agricultural Leasing Division at (505) 827-5851.

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